Handbell Choir Director Wall Quilt

After I completed the pipe organ quilt, I was approached about making a quilt for the handbell choir director.  I looked around for a while and then figured out a really fun idea after seeing this clip-art image.

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I realized I could use batik fabric and make the stained glass look more realistic.  I would use my beloved crepe back satin to make the bell.  The question was how.  There were too many colors to try a reverse applique, and I didn’t think piecing them together like I do in paper-piecing would look like the slightly imperfect leading of stained glass.  In the end, I realized that I couldn’t do much else than piece it together like a puzzle and applique it onto the white fabric.  Since it would be a wall quilt, I knew it wouldn’t take a beating like some of the other quilts I make.

So first, I picked out the fabric.  It’s one of the few times I have bought fat quarters. I also had some blue batik on hand at home from a previous graduation quilt.

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I used a projector to trace the clip-art onto paper at the proper size, and then I traced the image onto the fusible interfacing.  This explains why the image is reversed from the original clip-art.

In order to keep the piecing straight, I had to number them and take pictures for reference.  Then I cut the pieces out and ironed them onto the different colors, mostly at random. There were so many pieces that I had to put my husband to work helping me.  He was thrilled….

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Then I reassembled the pieces and ironed them down.

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From here, I began the tedious task of using the close-set zigzag stitch between all the piecing to recreate a “leading” look like there is in stained glass windows. Then I used some leftover black binding from a previous project and made the window outline.

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At this point I was ready to quilt.  I used a black backing and black thread on my bobbin with a white top thread.  I did a normal stipple in the white area.  I thought long and hard about how to handle the window part.  I didn’t want anything taking away from the stained glass look or the bell.  In the end, I played it safe and did a simple straight stitch over the black leading between the batik fabrics.  Then I used a dull gold/yellow thread I had to give the bell curves and add depth to it.

The last thing I did was add a sleeve.

So there you have it – from clip-art to quilt!

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Related Blogs and Posts:

handbell happy!

Advanced Quartet Rocks the Handbells

Handbell ringers want to pass on ‘dying art’

Cheerleader T-Shirt Quilt

This won’t be the last t-shirt quilt you all see.  They are sort of my bread and butter.  I do more t-shirt quilt commissions than I do anything else, and they help out with a lot around here. Graduation season is picking up, and I’m starting to see inquiries and am getting orders.  I’ve completed two already and am meeting someone for a 3rd.

In honor of graduation season coming upon us (a time that is often busier than Christmas for me), I’m doing a post on one of the senior quilts I made last year.  This one was interesting because the school colors were black and silver.  You would think this makes for a boring or “ugly” combination.  But I realized as we looked through the fabric that it was also a combination that was hard to get wrong. In fact, it made for a nice contrast to the shirts!

 

So I’ll show you guys a bit of my process.  For starters, I make a draft. This was for a basic layout – no sashing or borders.  The name was about the only frill.  I’ve gotten rather good at drafting layouts far more complicated on Microsoft Word.

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I use fusible interfacing to make sure that jersey knit stays put.  It’s stretchy and likes to bunch up without a stabilizer. The shirts themselves were quick since I wasn’t doing a border.  There was one spot open, and I made a quick 9-patch to match the backing.  This is a great example of why I tell folks not to stress about how many shirts I’ll need.  I usually tell them to send me what they want included, and I’ll try to figure out a way to make them all fit.

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This one was made of the senior’s cheerleading shirts.  There were plenty to be had and a generous amount of glitter! I liked the traces of pink in the shirts; they “popped” once they were placed beside the black and silver school colors.

 

 

For the backing, my client chose an “oil slick” design that was a nice and playful balance for the black and silver school colors.  I used the same fabric in the front 9-patch as well as the letters of the name.

This particular quilt was pretty fun to make!

Related blogs and posts:

Rosebud’s Quilts: Another t-shirt quilt

Rock & Roll Marathon T-Shirt Quilt

Quilts in Common: T-shirt quilt for graduation

 

 

The Artist’s Memory Quilt

This quilt goes down as one of the most emotional quilts I’ve done.  For starters, I was asked to complete it by another quilter, so I felt like it needed to be perfect. Another consideration was the fact that it was a memory quilt in memory of a younger person.  I’d done memory quilts before, and it wasn’t the first one I’d made for a mother.  But this one felt different, and I wanted more than anything to do the lady’s memory justice.  After all, I remembered her memorial service because I volunteered to help in the church nursery while it was going on.

Some things that stood out, however, were that my normal medium was gone.  This was not a standard t-shirt quilt.  In fact, there wasn’t a single t-shirt in any of the bags of clothes I was given!  But what I DID have was dress clothes.  Clothes with cool textures.  Clothes with beautiful embroidery.  Clothes with unique colors.  So I sat on the quilt idea and wondered what to do.

The mother, being a quilter, had suggested something akin to a “crazy quilt” style, but none of the patterns or images I found online seemed to be exactly right.  I looked around and must have seen 100 different ideas on how a crazy quilt can look.  And then one morning during my shower, where I do my best thinking, I thought of the 101st crazy quilt pattern!

Here’s the premise.  The lady was an artist.  Artists are all about color and balance and placement.  So I would make a sort of art gallery out of her clothes.  I would help to emphasize the “gallery” part by adding a shadowbox element to each of the sections. This would also allow all her different colors, textures, and details to be featured.

I started by going through the clothes.  I’d just gotten a new/old dining table to use as a craft table.  It was in my garage, so I stood there that night, listening to the chirping of crickets, at peace, sorting the clothes into the different color stacks.  I had enough for eight different color panels.  That left one empty block.  Then I had an idea I hoped would work for the last block.

Since she was an artist, and this was her gallery, I went through her old Facebook posts until I found exactly what I’d hoped to find – her artwork!  There’s some debate on whether the picture is a self-portrait or Tori Amos.  She wasn’t exactly distant comparison.  It was one of the few pieces I found, and I downloaded it immediately.

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Her artwork – printed on fabric.

Now that I knew how many stacks I had and how many blocks I could make, I sent the mother a draft layout.  We worked and switched a couple of color sections, and then I got the green light to start cutting.

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One of the first ones I did was red.  I’d been told she loved red; it was her favorite color.  So it seemed natural to begin here.  After that, I got better at my blocks and was able to knock out the other seven faster than I anticipated.

After that, I enlarged the artwork and used two pieces of fabric paper to print it out.  It was still smaller than I needed, so I added a red border to make it the same size as the other panels and began piecing the top together.

I added the shadow boxes and was happy to see them coming together. It wasn’t long before I was able to send her a picture of the completed top.

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Now the next challenge was with the quilting.  I thought long and hard about doing a simple stipple pattern, but then I had another idea.  I decided to revive the circle-swirl quilting pattern because I wanted to add some whimsy to it.  I also didn’t want to distract from the clothing panels, so I kept the main part of the quilting to the white area.  I used the dreaded “invisible thread” to reinforce the clothing panels and make sure they didn’t shift or bubble up.  (Imagine trying to sew with fishing line and you’ll understand why this kind of thread is a last resort.)

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I quilted in swirls to balance out the hard edges from the boxes.

We went back and forth on the backing and finally settled on a black, white, and red pattern.  From there, I had to complete the last element – but maybe the most important.  I had to make the label.  That took some thinking because I didn’t want it to be a let down.  I remembered that the mother was happy I’d chosen to focus on colors because her daughter’s memorial service featured a homily from a friend who described her in terms of color.  I loved it and was startled because, as said before, I wasn’t at the actual service.  I was in the nursery.

Keeping that in mind, I asked for a copy of the friend’s homily.  I used phrases and created a label based on that.  Now the lady’s sister deals in graphics, so she worked her magic and made my original label look far better.

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Her sister and I worked together to create a label based off of her friend’s words at the memorial service.

I printed the label on fabric and sewed it to the back corner.

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This quilt was a long journey, filled with emotion.  But it was also filled with creativity and pushed me to new limits.  In many ways, the artist from whom it was made inspired it, and I feel like she had a hand in its making.  In the end, it was and remains an honor to have been tasked with making this.  It is one of my favorite and proudest works.

Related Blogs and Posts – these are different memory quilts:

Memory Quilt

Memory Quilt – dad

Memory Quilt and Pillow

Seattle Streets Wedding Quilt

This quilt is made from a pattern called Seattle Streets.  I found it online at the Caritas Quilts blog.  A friend’s daughter was married, and for the wedding reception, they had all these different green and neutral combinations. I have used the Seattle Streets pattern for other projects as well, and I used it to make a quilt for my son and a quilt for my friend’s baby.  I like it, and it’s a great pattern when you have a lot of fabric to showcase, especially fabric with little patterns.

The pattern itself does take time, but it isn’t nearly the amount of time that it looks like it takes.  The tutorial is excellent! The secret I learned the hard way, and you can see it in the featured picture, is to remember to “square up” your blocks as this pattern can curve easily.  I forgot to do this, and with anything bigger than a baby blanket it shows a LOT.

To quilt it, I decided that swirls would balance out all the blocks and such.

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Swirl quilting design to balance to hard edges of the Seattle Streets pattern

I used it again on my friend’s baby quilt – using a pink line between the fabric instead of the black.

The first time I used this was for my son’s quilt.  I loved the fabrics I’d bought and wanted something that would look like stained glass.  This did the trick perfectly.

Jack's quilt

One day I’m going to make one of these bad boys using batiks!

Related Posts and Blogs:

Stained Glass Quilt Top

Another Stained Glass quilt

Unicorns, Glitter, and overcoming fears.

Confession time: I am afraid of triangles. Specifically, I’m afraid of using triangles in quilt tops. My past experiences with them have been less than pleasant and have included prying stuck corners out of my sewing machine feed, cutting-trimming-recutting, and getting aggravated because my corners didn’t line up. It’s been a long time since I’ve even bothered to try them. I’ve done paper piecing plenty, and I had resigned myself to that being the only way a dreaded triangle will ever enter my work. However, I love a challenge and hate being defeated, especially by my own self. So I decided recently to give the half-square triangle (referred to in quilting lingo as “HST”) another go. Luckily, I stumbled upon this little tutorial. It was perfect! No cloth corners getting stuck, and the angles were assured!

After testing it out and making one lap quilt and some test squares, I decided to use one of my pre-made kits and go for it.

That green and gold pinwheel is so much more than just a square.  It’s a refusal to be defeated!

I found a cute unicorn fabric in the remnants bin at JoAnn’s a while back, and I thought it would be cute with some pinwheels. It was at this point I decided to make the absolute, most over-the-top girly girl lap quilt impossible could! I made pink and green pinwheels, and I used light pink sparkly fabric for the borders.

When I went to look at the fabric for backing, I thought I might find a cute flannel, but I saw something I thought was much better. I ended up picking a bright pink flannel-backed satin, and it’ll be added warmth as well as a nice, sleek feel.

For quilting, I decided to forego my default “loops and swirls” and add another layer of “girly”. I drew a meandering pattern of hearts, stars, and flowers all over. The end result was rather cute.

Related posts and blogs:

Unicorn horn

Pixelated Unicorn Quilt

Magical Show and Tell – another cute unicorn quilt

Star Wars Quilts: Episode 4

This is the last episode to compliment episodes 1, 2, and 3.  Thanks for sticking with me!

At this point, both the Luke and Darth Vader quilt and the Rey and Kylo Ren quilt were ready for my mid-arm quilting machine.  On the original one I made, I had quilted a very close pattern because of the different fabrics I’d used.  The quilt has a nice “hand” (the weight and how it hangs) and works wonderfully, so I decided to keep a good thing going.

You can see here the details and tight horizontal swirls pattern I used.

On the original quilt, my son chose the backing and picked a blue mottled stars and sky fabric.  It looked awesome but was among the more expensive fabrics.  For these, I went with a simple black to help tie together the silhouettes themselves to the overall look of the quilt.  With so many blue variations, the black was needed.  I also liked how you could see the impressions of the characters on the back.

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Here are the final results.

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I had originally wanted to wait and begin selling these at my next craft show, but I decided to go ahead and place them on Etsy.

So here is the link to the Luke and Darth Vader listing.

Here is the link to the Rey and Kylo Ren listing.

Related posts and blogs:

6 Reasons Why I Fangirl over Star Wars

Why Rey is of the Utmost Importance

The Last Jedi: Kylo Ren and Rey

Star Wars Quilts: Episode 3

This post is a continuation of Episode 1 and Episode 2 – logically.

With Luke and Darth Vader taken care of, it was now time for Rey and Kylo Ren.  They presented a unique challenge because, while there were lots of images from which to choose, I couldn’t find many that translated into a silhouette well.  One would have a good profile, but the body wasn’t in a good position; another would be missing the feet but everything else was perfect.  In the end, I picked a couple of pictures where everything was right except the head, and I imposed a different picture’s head onto it, adjusting for size, etc.  I really wanted Rey’s specific hairdo included, and I did NOT want a silhouette of Kylo Ren’s hood up.

Just like the other one, I traced the images from a projector onto paper, and then I traced them again onto the Pellon 805 fusible interfacing.

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These figures had a lot more detail than Luke and Darth Vader, and they took longer to cut out.  Not to mention Kylo Ren’s interfacing did NOT want to peel off properly.

 

If you look carefully, you can see where I’ve used a lot of pins on Kylo Ren.  I decided Kylo Ren in fabric form was just as aggravating as Kylo Ren in the cinema form.  *But we all love and adore Adam Driver in this house!

After this, there’s lots of ironing and sewing with the zigzag stitch as I attached them to the blue strip background.  Somewhere in here I added lightsabers and had a needle break on my sewing machine.  A piece of it flew towards my eye, and I’m grateful for such trivial things as eyelids.  Mine worked just as it ought and kept my actual eye from being hit.  Yikes!

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Almost there!  Stay tuned tomorrow for the final episode.

Related posts and blogs:

Darth Vader, Marines, and Reading Aloud

Contemplating Kylo Ren

The Defining Moments of Kylo Ren

Star Wars Quilts: Episode 2

This post is a continuation from yesterday’s.

After sewing all the strips together for two twin-sized quilts, I had to get to work on the silhouettes.  The Luke and Darth Vader ones were easy because I still had the silhouettes from the original quilt.

The key to making these quilts is to use the 805 Pellon fusible web interfacing.  I traced the images onto the interfacing, pinned them to the quilt, and then I ironed away.

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It’s strange.  When the 805 works like it’s supposed to and peels off properly, you get fabric with an entire side of glue that’s ready to be ironed onto another piece of fabric.  For these, some of the spots worked correctly, but I had a lot of areas that simply didn’t want to cooperate.  This is where I had to go back and pin again.  The fusible interfacing to there to ensure everything stays put and doesn’t shift while being sewn down.

The next step was the cut out the figures.

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I like to use gray for the lightsaber handle and satin for the lightsaber blades.  I had considered several other options before settling on satin, including glow-in-the-dark fabric.  But I couldn’t resist the sheen of the satin and liked how it “popped”.  I ironed the lightsabers on right after the figures were situated.

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I used the close-set zigzag stitch and my duel-feed foot to trace around my figures and make sure they were secure.  After Luke and Darth Vader were ready, I moved on to my newer silhouettes: Rey and Kylo Ren.

Stay tuned tomorrow for Episode 3.

Related posts and blogs:

DIY Star Wars Quilt

Raising Darth Vader

Supernerdydadreviews: A New Hope

Star Wars Quilts: Episode 1

A while back I wanted to use up some of my blue fabric from my fabric stash since the drawer was overflowing.  My son had recently asked for a Star Wars quilt, so I decided to take care of both challenges at the same time.

Fast forward to the fall of that year, and I am participating in a rather large craft fair – one of the largest I’d done.  I find out my booth is on the corner, and I panic because I simply can’t have the side of my booth be the backs of the quilts hanging up on the inside.  I needed something to hang on the outside of the booth, but I’d sold a couple of quilts on Etsy that would have done the job.  I ran upstairs and asked my little buddy if I could borrow his Star Wars quilt for the show.  He’s such a good sport and didn’t hesitate to agree.  I placed it on the outside, and the visibility was excellent.

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The original Star Wars quilt hanging outside my booth at a craft fair.

When I placed his quilt up, I expected it to gain some attention, but I wasn’t prepared for how much attention it would garner.  My booth neighbor behind me said that everyone who passed by her booth was talking about the Star Wars quilt.  I had several people ask about what it would cost to make one for them since I had a “Not for Sale” tag on my son’s.  I joked that if he wasn’t in charge of my end-of-life decisions I could have sold that quilt three times that day.  So it seemed a no-brainer that I would make one to sell after that show.

It didn’t hurt that I still had a lot of blue fabric left over from previous projects, gifted to me, or rescued from remnant bins.  The first thing I did was to get out all the blue fabric I intended on using and placed it in the order I wanted.

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All the blue fabric I intended on using.

After that, I cut them all into 3.5″ strips.

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From there, I sewed the strips end-to-end and rolled them up on an empty tissue holder.  The final radius of that roll was 4.25″.

There’s not much new in the quilting world in regards to techniques, but I *might* be the first person I know of to use what I call the “chair technique”.  I had my husband video the beginning of the process.

From here, I sewed together the strips into pairs so as to make organizing easier.

It was here I realized I had much more than the original twin-size quilt goal.  In fact, I had exactly enough strips cut to make TWO twin-sized quilts. I laid everything out and then picked up every other strip segment; this helped in that my strips were still going in order from lightest to darkest, allowing the silhouettes to be mostly in the lighter fabric.

I decided that I would make one with the original Luke and Darth Vader silhouettes like I had for my son, but the second one would be linked to the newest film and feature Rey and Kylo Ren.

Stayed tuned tomorrow for Episode 2.

Related posts and blogs:

Katy Quilts: Finish it Up Thursday

Aby Quilts: Star Wars Quilt Finished!

Legacy of a Last Jedi

Harry Potter Quilt

This was a commission from a friend.  As you can see, she is clearly a Harry Potter fanatic, but so am I!  This was fun because I liked being able to work in all of the house colors.  It was harder than I thought it would be to make sure I had the exact colors.  The reference pictures were so varied.  I remember fussing a lot over the Gryffindor shade of red and the Ravenclaw shade of blue.  It didn’t help that the quidditch robes had some variations from the house colors as well.

The crests were a neat challenge.  I decided to play it authentic and use the crest images from the books.  I printed them out on fabric, ironed on fusible interfacing, and then ironed them onto black felt.  After that I simply appliqued them into the center of their house colors checkerboard.  I was trying to mimic the style of my letter jacket from high school, but if I had it to do over again I might just stick with a simple crest shape for the black felt part.

The Hogwarts “H” in the center was supposed to be simple, but my printer refused to print out the “H” any darker than a medium gray.  I simply couldn’t get it black, so I went in with black t-shirt paint and colored in the H to make it stand out like it should.

By far the hardest and most time-consuming aspect of this project was the quote.  She chose a quote from Sirius Black.

“We’ve all got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are.”

The quilter in me was annoyed that the quote had unnecessary words in it, especially as that meant anywhere from 20-30 extra minutes of work for each word.  The English teacher in me was annoyed because good writing is usually streamlined.  All I could do was remind myself that the wizarding world does not have copies of Strunk and White’s Elements of Style at Flourish and Blott’s.  *All jokes aside, the quote is excellent and true as the day is long.  To make the quote, I brought in the stripes of black fabric to my school and traced the letters with quilter’s chalk onto the fabric.  I’d heard hairspray can help keep it from rubbing off, so I sprayed it generously afterwards.  From there, I had to use a light interfacing to keep the words from puckering.  I set my sewing machine to the close zigzag stitch that I like to use when pretending my machine is an embroidery machine.  I traced the letters, taking extra care on the curves.  I used a Calibri font to make sure I had the simplest version of the letters so they’d have a clean look.

My friend had suggested the whole quote be in the Harry Potter style font, but I wasn’t so sure that would look good overall as it would be hard to read, especially with me not using a real embroidery machine.  But I hate saying no, so I suggested we use that font for the quote source at the end.  So if you look closely, you’ll notice that “Sirius Black” is done in a different style font.  I think it turned out well.

As a last surprise for my friend, I decided to try something new with my quilting pattern.  I figured out how to draw a meandering lightening bolt, broom, Deathly Hallows symbol, and wand.  Using them, I had a repeating pattern throughout the quilt, giving an extra layer of meaning to an already fun quilt.  I enjoyed making this quilt, and I learned a lot in the process.

Related posts and blogs:

Jasmin Heaven Blog

Historian Ruby – Harry Potter: A History of Magic

Merv Reads: Why It Took Me So Long to Read Harry Potter Books

Crafting Doctor: Harry Potter Quilt