Tis the season!…for Quilt Scams on Facebook

Over the last few days, I’ve seen a lot, and I mean A LOT, of targeted advertisements for commercial quilts.  It made sense.  I’m a quilter, and I am probably in one of the top ten hits from any targeted ad involving quilts.  No surprise there.

I’ll admit I was taken in by the beauty of these advertisements at first, but as I had no intention of buying them I didn’t look all too closely.  It wasn’t until a sweet person in one of my quilting groups asked about the fabric in one that I learned the truth.  Another person posted the link to a news segment about the scam.  They used the name of a store that was only slightly off, and that poor store had received numerous calls from scam victims asking when their quilt would arrive.  Over and over again, that lady had to break the news to them that they’d been scammed.  I was surprised when I recognized the image of the scam as similar to ones that had been on my news feed pretty constantly.  Some of my other friends had also taken notice, and I believe they tried to buy them.

Here’s what a few minutes of poking around amounted to.   Here’s the original image that probably came across your news feed.  It’ll be this quilt or any variation therein.

Quilt image

 

If you click on the link, you’ll find a legit spot where you can buy it.  It has all sorts of useful information on payments, customer reviews, shipping, etc.

buying

If you need to contact them, there is either a form, like on this page, or some type of email address. This one was the first I’d seen with a full address.  The others either didn’t have an address or it was partial.  The lack of a phone number, or at least a working one, is a dead giveaway.

contact us

I looked up the address, and this was what I found on the street view. The house to one side is 2030, and the house to the other side is 2060.  There is NO 2055 Hazel Ave at this location or across the street.

street view

Ok, so the next step would be to try to email address.  This isn’t the first one to do this.  Another one I tried had a space in between the front of the email and the “@” symbol.  I closed that gap so it would work correctly, but I never did hear back.  This particular email address bounced back within a minute.

bounced email

So no phone number, no correct address, and no email.  Yeah, this isn’t a legit product at all.  I went back in and looked at the merchandise itself since that was the original draw.  I’m not sure where the images for the quilts/blankets themselves came from, but they are most certainly photo shopped.

In this set, it’s pretty cool how, in the red circle, you can see the quilt is placed in the exact same spot of the display.  I’m good at set ups, but I’m never that good.  It also has the same fold up top.  And in the yellow circle, you can see that the editor got sloppy and didn’t change the red binding color or navy blue backing in that spot – even if the front of the quilt had no such binding or colors.

Photoshop set 1

In the second set, you can see the same issues. The leaves fall gracefully over the quilt in the exact same way.  The same fold can be seen in the blue circle, and even the smaller creases in the yellow circle are duplicated.

Photoshop set 2

So what happens now?  For a good while, I reported as many to Facebook as I could find.  When given the option, I specifically reported it was “misleading or scam”.  I remembered the news segment saying that Facebook was actively trying to take down the scam, but it was going strong on my feed despite the news segment being four days old now.

Here’s what I have received so far in regards to my reports.  Long story short – the advertisement itself is fine and goes with their standards.  I suppose they are washing their hands clean of the fact that they know it’s an active scam.

Facebook feedback

Funny enough, I tried to find a link where I could email them directly and explain why the ads were scam.  However, just like the websites I investigated, I couldn’t find an actual email or message section.  Funny how that works, right?

Long story short – please don’t be taken in by these ads that seem too good to be true.  They are.  Please share and reshare to spread awareness since Facebook seems uninterested in taking them down.

Fox Quilt

**This quilt is currently for sale in my Etsy shop: Fox Quilt listing

This quilt is a remnants bin challenge result.  I found some cute fox fabric in the JoAnn’s remnants bin and used what I had at the house to build a quilt around it – gray, black, and two orange hues.  I was happy with the result, especially since I finally found a use for the orange and black hounds tooth flannel I bought last Black Friday.

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I do wish I’d arranged the colors differently, though.  My original goal was to have a gradient effect.  I’ve grown to like it, though, and I added a few little foxes around the other blocks to create an interesting focal point.

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Related blogs and posts:

Fox Face Quilt Square Pattern

No More Humidicrib Quilts

Forgive my tardiness – fox quilt

 

 

 

 

Craft Fair Season Fall ’18 – done!

Alrighty, so I’m all finished with my craft fairs as of last weekend.  I decided that no one was going to buy quilts during the spring, so I shifted all my focus to fall shows, undertaking four shows in six weeks.  This wouldn’t sound like much to someone who does shows all the time, but as a teacher with two small kids – it’s a lot.  My kids were begging me not to go by the  3rd show.

I’ve placed any quilts that haven’t sold up on my Etsy store, so feel free to take a look.

Quest Quilts Etsy Shop

Here’s what I learned as a seller of quilts at shows.

  1. You can tell within the first two hours what kind of a day you’re going to have.  Plenty of people will stop and “oooh” and “ahhh”, but if they aren’t actually looking at the price tags then don’t get your hopes up.
  2. Gender-neutral or “boy” quilts sell faster.  Not sure why.  Maybe because many quilts look decidedly “girly”?
  3. When you sell one quilt the entire show, it’ll be both good and bad.  You’ll think, “Yay, I made my booth fee back and then some!”  You’ll also realize, “Well, after my booth fee I basically made $40.  I sat there for 8+ hours for $40?”
  4. Commissions are a delayed gratification for doing these shows.  So while you may not sell the ready-made stuff, the commissions later on do add up and make it worthwhile.
  5. People love to share stories of how their family members were also quilters.  They’ll tell you all about them while standing in the middle of your booth, blocking other people from seeing in.
  6. Be sweet to your booth neighbor, especially if you’re in your booth alone.  You may need that person to stand between booths so you can run to the bathroom.
  7. Outside craft fairs are havoc for crafts that involve fabric.  I was downwind from a BBQ vendor one show.  My quilts smelled like BBQ afterwards.  This could be cool for a bit, but in the end it involved me tumbling them in the dryer with dryer sheets in an attempt to get rid of the smell.  I’ve heard of other vendors experiencing the same thing with kettle corn booths nearby as well.
  8. There was also the issue of smokers at outdoor shows.  I had folks smoke near my stuff, and one cigarette came within an inch of my personal t-shirt quilt that I use at shows.  I panicked.  I also had one show begin a fire pit a few feet from my booth, and I finally agreed to move my booth mid-show to another spot.  It still didn’t work, and I had to, once again, air out and tumble my product in an attempt to get the smell out.
  9. Some people can be quite passive aggressive about prices, and it isn’t cute.
  10. It’s a special feeling when you meet someone who has the same sense of humor and/or interest as you.  I loved talking about Dr. Who and Star Wars with folks.
  11. People seem more inclined to come in and shop around if you’re reading a magazine or book.  Maybe there’s less pressure?  They don’t feel like they’re being scrutinized?
  12. There is such a feeling of accomplishment when someone says your quilt is “perfect” for someone they know as they buy it.  Gives you a warm, fuzzy feeling.

There was also the issue of my role as vendor vs artist, but that’s for another post.  Stay tuned.

 

Related blogs and posts:

Craft Fairs, Bookmarks, & Squirrels in my Van…

Craft Fair Season is Here!

Craft fair fun

The Craft Booth – a blog

 

Bookcase Wall Quilt

A friend from church approached me about making a quilt for the church retreat in October.  When I heard that the theme was “Connecting Through Stories”, I just knew which quilt design I wanted to do.  I’d had my eye on a bookcase quilt for ages and wanted to give it a try, so I used this as an opportunity to finally make one.

I started by cutting my scraps into various strips of width and length.  I did stick to fabrics that I felt someone would be able to write on and be easily visible.  Of course, every once in a while I threw in a darker color for balance.

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Then I sewed those scraps into large pieces of white muslin and trimmed them all to be about 12.5″ long.  From there, I sewed the “books” into blocks of roughly 12.5″ square.

Bookshelf scraps
Scraps for a bookshelf quilt

I also used some of the particularly smaller “books” to make stacks.

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The hard part came when I knew I needed to make about four books that leaned.  I did this by attaching white fabric all the way around and then using my grid to skew the cut, making sure to leave .25″ of white at the corners so that my book didn’t look like it was sinking into the shelf.

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From there I made my “shelf”.

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I did find a nice wood grain fabric at JoAnn’s, and I used it for the shelf.  The wood grain fabric was pretty pricey, though, so I went with a more cost-effective brown fabric for the back since it would be in a wall anyway.

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I decided to only quilt on the wood grain fabric since the shelves and books needed to be open for signatures, but I do think I’ll go back and quilt those sections at least a little before all is said and done.

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I did have one large brown block in the center of the shelves.  This actually isn’t a book but rather a frame.  My idea was to take a group picture of everyone at the retreat, print it on fabric, and then make it look like a photograph on the shelf.

The last step was to add a hanging sleeve. I can’t wait for everyone to see it at the retreat!

Related blogs and posts:

The Making of the Bookshelf Quilt: Planning Stage

Bookshelf Quilt

 

 

 

Empty Bobbins: The Walker

The name comes from those times when you’re in the middle of a project and your bobbin runs out.  You have to pause what you’re doing and reload.  While you do that, you have a moment to just sit and reflect.  This is a collection of musings and reflections on life’s moments. Some are quilting related, and some are not. This entry was featured on a previous blog of mine years ago.


So I grew up in the South, deep South, and one of the core understandings of Southern culture is to wave, nod, or otherwise gesture when passing someone or making eye contact. I had the pleasure of living briefly in Alexandria, VA. While I adored it there, there was no small amount of culture shock that I discovered the hard way.
I won’t forget my second day there when I made eye contact with someone, an older man at that, and before I even realized what I’d done, I’d given him a nod – otherwise known as the “Howdo?” nod. It’s a small thing, but the idea behind it is that you’re acknowledging that person. And that man, who back home would have smiled and maybe even chatted, scowled – actually scowled – at me. Well, that put my “Howdo?s” in check pretty fast. I remember feeling so awkward when I would pass someone who seemed, at least to me, to be going out of his/her way to ignore me.
So I returned after a year to see a friend after having moved back to the homeland, and I found myself being reminded of my roots while walking. I was alone on the sidewalk when I spied a man walking towards me a good ways off. Again, where I come from, it’s considered polite to make eye contact and smile or nod. Jeebus, do something to acknowledge that someone is taking up mass in the same vicinity as you! Anyhow, as I watched, the man seemed stiff, and his neck was so rigid that it left no doubt that he knew I was there, walking in his space, breathing in his air. And yet…and yet he was going out of his way to not look at me. It was clearly much more uncomfortable to him than me as I gazed at the scenario, amused. At least I waited until he passed before laughing out loud. Imagine, going through all that just to not look at me. It has gone down as one of the silliest moments I can remember from up there.
How often do we go out of our way to avoid the obvious?

Related blogs and posts:

Porchscene: Exploring Southern Culture

The Cultural Markers of Southern Culture

 

Woodland Creatures Baby Quilt

This quilt was for a friend as a surprise at her baby shower.  I knew we wanted to tie in to her overall theme of woodland creatures, and I did several searches for different images.  In the end, I went with the images on her actual shower invitation.  (She loves sloths, so we snuck in one of those as well!)

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I traced the images onto basic copy paper and then retraced them backwards onto fusible interfacing.

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From there, the layering process began.  I had to trace each layer backwards onto the fusible interfacing as well and then iron them on top of one another.  I’ll admit there were several times here where I thought of different ways to simplify, but in the end it just wouldn’t do.  The fox was simplified accidentally, but that was about it.

 

 

From there, I ironed them into place and used a large mushroom top to hide their bottoms behind because the original images were cropped as well.  It look some rearranging before I finally hit this layout.

 

 

Going back and adding in the white “light spots” on the eyes was one of the best moves I did.  Before that, they looked cute but kind of flat.  They had a deadpan look that kept them lifeless.  The sloth, especially, looked somewhat stoned.

And one again, I added a close-set zigzag stitch to finish off the applique elements.

The reason everything was right at the bottom was because we intended for people to be able to sign the quilt with well-wishes for the new family.

 

Here’s a video of the sweet soon-to-be parents receiving their surprise!

 

 

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