Baby Clothes Memory Quilt

This was a Christmas present commission I received as a result of the Lilburn Daze craft fair.  The client met me and had a huge bag of baby clothes.  Then she said what I consider music to my ears, “I trust you.”  She was letting me have complete artistic freedom!  I had several ideas for baby clothes, but there were factors that helped narrow it down to this style.

For starters, some of the clothes had already been cut, and they were different sizes, so making a basic quilt with the same square shape was most likely out.  The sheer number of clothes would probably have been a factor as well.  I noticed that several of the clothes needed to feature the front or had a cute pattern, and those would need to be in a spot that featured them.  So in the end, I followed the same route as I did with the Artist’s Memory Quilt.  I divided the clothes up into differing colors or themes; there were so many of the blue and red that they made two squares.

When you have a lot of fabrics and a small space to put them, then crazy quilt style is the way to go.  I was still a big fan of the shadowbox style, and I knew it would help make the blocks look extra cool.  I somehow managed to work in all of the clothes from that huge, full bag of baby clothes.

The last request the client had was the have the phrase “You and me against the world” somewhere on the quilt.  The things is…shadowboxes are tricky, and their illusion of being 3-D relies on nothing else being around the block.  So having the words somewhere highly visible would ruin the 3-D aspect.  So I decided to have the phrase worked in via a more subtle way.  I wrote the phrase in while quilting between two of the rows.  I just wrote it in cursive, so the phrase is there and the shadowboxes are in full effect.

A simple textured blue for the backing and binding brings everything together!

Related Posts and Blogs:

Make a Baby Onesie Quilt

Baby Quilts from Daddy’s Shirts


Runner T-shirt Quilt

This commission came as the result of one of my craft fair shows.  It was fun because the colors were not the conventional ones I was used to, but I loved loved loved them!

Instead of my traditional sashing style, I used the alternating frames look and let the harvest orange and eggplant purple frames play off one another.  The backing was the neat brocade print with a darker orange design on top of a lighter orange.  In my head I was referring to it as “pumpkin spice” orange.  As I went on and kept seeing the colors together I began to like them more and more.  I remember debating with my client for a long time in the store over the different color combinations, and I remembering saying something along the lines of “if you want to play it safe, then go for blue.”  But we both kept coming back to the orange and purple combo, and I was eager to start.

One thing that made this quilt more challenging was the runner bibs element.  The client had read somewhere that sewing them was possible, but I wasn’t so sure.  I noticed that one had foam on the back and several had stickers on the front.  I kept imagining how my machine would act when it hit that foam and how the stickers would act once the quilt was washed.  Neither scenario was good.  In the end, she took me up on my suggestion to scan the bibs and then applique them into a block.  She had so many that we used up two blocks to make it all work out. It helped when we realized we didn’t need the sponsors section of the bibs and I could crop them out.  In the end, the bibs were only slightly smaller than the original ones, and she had her original ones back – unharmed.

In the end it was the color combo that had me so excited for this particular quilt, and I still think it’s one of the best and boldest combos I’ve seen.

I scanned running bibs and incorporated them into the bottom two corners of the quilt.

Related blogs and posts:

Runner’s T-shirt Quilt

Am I a Runner?

So You Want to be a Runner

Quilted History


Mariner’s Compass Wall Quilt


When we moved into our new house, I noticed at once that the nice, big living area lent itself to a nice, big echo. And I thought to myself that, alas, I would simply HAVE to make a wall quilt for our new home.  Such a burden…right?

I did realize that if I was hanging it up in the main area that it would need to be something that I wouldn’t mind seeing everyday and that I was particularly proud of.  Well, that can only be one pattern of course – the mariner’s compass!

Like many of my quilts I make, I tried to make this one out of fabric I already had on hand.  Luckily for me, I had bought some blue and gold themed fabric at the same quilt store where I’d gone to look at mid-arm quilting machines.  I don’t often buy fabric without a project already in mind, but this was too pretty to pass up.  And it was the last of the bundles as far as I could see.  The only fabric I bought after that was the fabric for the borders.

I like to use the Mariner’s Compass Stars guide by Carol Doak.  Paper piecing can be difficult when you start out, but I’d already made a king-size quilt for my husband using this same pattern.  So I’d had practice aplenty.

I’ll admit that this pattern, a paper-pieced mariner’s compass, is just about the one pattern I refuse to do on commission.  If you aren’t familiar with it, then let me explain.  For paper piecing you actually sew the fabric onto paper, and then you tear the paper off after each wedge is done.  To make one block you need to make eight wedges!  So yes, it’s very time-consuming.  But boy the results are stunning!

By the way, the Quest Quilts image I use on a lot of things is another Doak star.


I am eye-balling a possible ready-made quilt at some point using one of these star patterns, but I haven’t fully decided yet.  Stay tuned folks!

Related blogs and posts:

Mariner’s Compass Quilt

A Round Mariner’s Compass Baby Quilt

Paper Piecing 


Rainbow Bargello Quilt

Would you like to know a secret?  You see the rainbow quilt that’s at the top of every page?  It’s for sale.  It’s been on my Etsy shop for a while, and it gets a lot of attention at my craft fairs.  But no one has stepped up to take it home.  Here it is.

I’ve always considered bargello quilts to be particularly impressive.  Seriously, they’re like a fabric kaleidoscope!  I had also considered them out of my league, so you’ll imagine my surprise when I found a nice tutorial at the Lets Quilt Something blog that made them not look scary at all!  In fact, the tutorial helped me make the decision to finally give it a go.

I wasn’t using a jelly roll (pre-cut fabric strips), though.  I had so much fabric in my stash that I couldn’t justify it – although I did have to go out and grab some orange fabric before everything was said and done.


After cutting and joining strips for forever, I followed the tutorial exactly as described.  It worked beautifully!  (I won’t say without hitches, but those weren’t the fault of the tutorial.)  I had so many little strips of fabric that I had to use my cork board and pin them up in order.


I finally saw the top starting to come together, and I really liked what I was seeing.  Once the top was completed, I was at a loss on how to quilt it.  I did NOT want the quilting to take away from the top design, so I knew early on I’d probably have to switch out thread and such.  But unlike some of my other projects, I swapped out the thread in both the top and in the bobbin.  This would make for a colorful design both front and back.

The quilting design came from a sort of challenge from my sister.  She was with me at my second craft fair and commented on how I had no other quilting designs except for stipples and loops.  She asked if I was capable of anything else.  Well, I decided this quilt would be there I showed her what else I could do.  I quilted FLAMES!

It took forever.

It’s by far one of my favorite quilts, and I even entered it into my church’s talent show in the craft talents section.  Several times I’ve thought about just keeping it for myself, but I’ve kept it up for sale for some reason.  I’m hoping someone else can see how much work went into it and can appreciate it for what it is.  I do plan on making another one in the future, but I’ll probably cheat and just use a jelly roll next time.

Lesson learned – long live the bargello quilt!

My rainbow bargello quilt!

Related Blogs and Posts:

Quilted three fabric bargello

Autumn Bargello

Bargello Video Tutorial

Handbell Choir Director Wall Quilt

After I completed the pipe organ quilt, I was approached about making a quilt for the handbell choir director.  I looked around for a while and then figured out a really fun idea after seeing this clip-art image.


I realized I could use batik fabric and make the stained glass look more realistic.  I would use my beloved crepe back satin to make the bell.  The question was how.  There were too many colors to try a reverse applique, and I didn’t think piecing them together like I do in paper-piecing would look like the slightly imperfect leading of stained glass.  In the end, I realized that I couldn’t do much else than piece it together like a puzzle and applique it onto the white fabric.  Since it would be a wall quilt, I knew it wouldn’t take a beating like some of the other quilts I make.

So first, I picked out the fabric.  It’s one of the few times I have bought fat quarters. I also had some blue batik on hand at home from a previous graduation quilt.


I used a projector to trace the clip-art onto paper at the proper size, and then I traced the image onto the fusible interfacing.  This explains why the image is reversed from the original clip-art.

In order to keep the piecing straight, I had to number them and take pictures for reference.  Then I cut the pieces out and ironed them onto the different colors, mostly at random. There were so many pieces that I had to put my husband to work helping me.  He was thrilled….


Then I reassembled the pieces and ironed them down.


From here, I began the tedious task of using the close-set zigzag stitch between all the piecing to recreate a “leading” look like there is in stained glass windows. Then I used some leftover black binding from a previous project and made the window outline.


At this point I was ready to quilt.  I used a black backing and black thread on my bobbin with a white top thread.  I did a normal stipple in the white area.  I thought long and hard about how to handle the window part.  I didn’t want anything taking away from the stained glass look or the bell.  In the end, I played it safe and did a simple straight stitch over the black leading between the batik fabrics.  Then I used a dull gold/yellow thread I had to give the bell curves and add depth to it.

The last thing I did was add a sleeve.

So there you have it – from clip-art to quilt!


Related Blogs and Posts:

handbell happy!

Advanced Quartet Rocks the Handbells

Handbell ringers want to pass on ‘dying art’

Cheerleader T-Shirt Quilt

This won’t be the last t-shirt quilt you all see.  They are sort of my bread and butter.  I do more t-shirt quilt commissions than I do anything else, and they help out with a lot around here. Graduation season is picking up, and I’m starting to see inquiries and am getting orders.  I’ve completed two already and am meeting someone for a 3rd.

In honor of graduation season coming upon us (a time that is often busier than Christmas for me), I’m doing a post on one of the senior quilts I made last year.  This one was interesting because the school colors were black and silver.  You would think this makes for a boring or “ugly” combination.  But I realized as we looked through the fabric that it was also a combination that was hard to get wrong. In fact, it made for a nice contrast to the shirts!


So I’ll show you guys a bit of my process.  For starters, I make a draft. This was for a basic layout – no sashing or borders.  The name was about the only frill.  I’ve gotten rather good at drafting layouts far more complicated on Microsoft Word.

Ariel Layout

I use fusible interfacing to make sure that jersey knit stays put.  It’s stretchy and likes to bunch up without a stabilizer. The shirts themselves were quick since I wasn’t doing a border.  There was one spot open, and I made a quick 9-patch to match the backing.  This is a great example of why I tell folks not to stress about how many shirts I’ll need.  I usually tell them to send me what they want included, and I’ll try to figure out a way to make them all fit.


This one was made of the senior’s cheerleading shirts.  There were plenty to be had and a generous amount of glitter! I liked the traces of pink in the shirts; they “popped” once they were placed beside the black and silver school colors.



For the backing, my client chose an “oil slick” design that was a nice and playful balance for the black and silver school colors.  I used the same fabric in the front 9-patch as well as the letters of the name.

This particular quilt was pretty fun to make!

Related blogs and posts:

Rosebud’s Quilts: Another t-shirt quilt

Rock & Roll Marathon T-Shirt Quilt

Quilts in Common: T-shirt quilt for graduation



The Artist’s Memory Quilt

This quilt goes down as one of the most emotional quilts I’ve done.  For starters, I was asked to complete it by another quilter, so I felt like it needed to be perfect. Another consideration was the fact that it was a memory quilt in memory of a younger person.  I’d done memory quilts before, and it wasn’t the first one I’d made for a mother.  But this one felt different, and I wanted more than anything to do the lady’s memory justice.  After all, I remembered her memorial service because I volunteered to help in the church nursery while it was going on.

Some things that stood out, however, were that my normal medium was gone.  This was not a standard t-shirt quilt.  In fact, there wasn’t a single t-shirt in any of the bags of clothes I was given!  But what I DID have was dress clothes.  Clothes with cool textures.  Clothes with beautiful embroidery.  Clothes with unique colors.  So I sat on the quilt idea and wondered what to do.

The mother, being a quilter, had suggested something akin to a “crazy quilt” style, but none of the patterns or images I found online seemed to be exactly right.  I looked around and must have seen 100 different ideas on how a crazy quilt can look.  And then one morning during my shower, where I do my best thinking, I thought of the 101st crazy quilt pattern!

Here’s the premise.  The lady was an artist.  Artists are all about color and balance and placement.  So I would make a sort of art gallery out of her clothes.  I would help to emphasize the “gallery” part by adding a shadowbox element to each of the sections. This would also allow all her different colors, textures, and details to be featured.

I started by going through the clothes.  I’d just gotten a new/old dining table to use as a craft table.  It was in my garage, so I stood there that night, listening to the chirping of crickets, at peace, sorting the clothes into the different color stacks.  I had enough for eight different color panels.  That left one empty block.  Then I had an idea I hoped would work for the last block.

Since she was an artist, and this was her gallery, I went through her old Facebook posts until I found exactly what I’d hoped to find – her artwork!  There’s some debate on whether the picture is a self-portrait or Tori Amos.  She wasn’t exactly distant comparison.  It was one of the few pieces I found, and I downloaded it immediately.

Her artwork – printed on fabric.

Now that I knew how many stacks I had and how many blocks I could make, I sent the mother a draft layout.  We worked and switched a couple of color sections, and then I got the green light to start cutting.


One of the first ones I did was red.  I’d been told she loved red; it was her favorite color.  So it seemed natural to begin here.  After that, I got better at my blocks and was able to knock out the other seven faster than I anticipated.

After that, I enlarged the artwork and used two pieces of fabric paper to print it out.  It was still smaller than I needed, so I added a red border to make it the same size as the other panels and began piecing the top together.

I added the shadow boxes and was happy to see them coming together. It wasn’t long before I was able to send her a picture of the completed top.


Now the next challenge was with the quilting.  I thought long and hard about doing a simple stipple pattern, but then I had another idea.  I decided to revive the circle-swirl quilting pattern because I wanted to add some whimsy to it.  I also didn’t want to distract from the clothing panels, so I kept the main part of the quilting to the white area.  I used the dreaded “invisible thread” to reinforce the clothing panels and make sure they didn’t shift or bubble up.  (Imagine trying to sew with fishing line and you’ll understand why this kind of thread is a last resort.)

I quilted in swirls to balance out the hard edges from the boxes.

We went back and forth on the backing and finally settled on a black, white, and red pattern.  From there, I had to complete the last element – but maybe the most important.  I had to make the label.  That took some thinking because I didn’t want it to be a let down.  I remembered that the mother was happy I’d chosen to focus on colors because her daughter’s memorial service featured a homily from a friend who described her in terms of color.  I loved it and was startled because, as said before, I wasn’t at the actual service.  I was in the nursery.

Keeping that in mind, I asked for a copy of the friend’s homily.  I used phrases and created a label based on that.  Now the lady’s sister deals in graphics, so she worked her magic and made my original label look far better.

Label 2.0
Her sister and I worked together to create a label based off of her friend’s words at the memorial service.

I printed the label on fabric and sewed it to the back corner.


This quilt was a long journey, filled with emotion.  But it was also filled with creativity and pushed me to new limits.  In many ways, the artist from whom it was made inspired it, and I feel like she had a hand in its making.  In the end, it was and remains an honor to have been tasked with making this.  It is one of my favorite and proudest works.

Related Blogs and Posts – these are different memory quilts:

Memory Quilt

Memory Quilt – dad

Memory Quilt and Pillow